Safety is everything

WORKSAFE

Safety is everything

Over decades of education and awareness, workplace safety has become ingrained in our approach to work. But what about hazards that aren’t all that obvious – that aren’t physical, but mental? We needed to educate Tasmanian workers – from CEOs and managers, to entry-level and casual employees – about how mental health can play a factor in workplace safety.

Rather than presenting mental health as a new concept, we simply had to show that it was a natural extension of something people already knew: how to keep themselves and others safe at work. This led us to a simple, powerful and single-minded approach: to incorporate mental safety messaging alongside existing physical safety messaging in an all-encompassing campaign that felt familiar, achievable and non-threatening:

Safety is everything.

We did this by turning our creative into a puzzle – almost like Where’s Wally? Across three TVCs, we showed a cross-section of a large office building. The footage then tracked in on someone experiencing the subtler effects of negative mental health, such as depression, stress or being abused at work. Our hero TVCs were supported by print, digital, eDMs and small outdoor pieces that all followed the same idea.

By using a bit of misdirection and entertainment, we were able to spread a vital health message.

Quad bikes safety campaign

WORKSAFE

Quad bikes safety campaign

Despite an alarming number of quad bike riders being killed or injured in quad bike incidents, Tasmanians were still underestimating the dangers of quad bikes. Contributing factors in these deaths were lack of helmet use, inadequate training, and the young age and inexperience of riders. WorkSafe needed an awareness campaign that warned of the potentially devastating consequences of unsafe quad bike use.

We decided to showcase the terrifying numbers – in eight years, 128 Australians have died riding quad bikes. These statistics were paired with stark, chilling imagery of flipped quad bikes that represented those killed while riding quad bikes. The supporting message was simple: a quad bike is not a toy.

The digital campaign performed well above expectation, with the campaign value exceeding the budget substantially. As at March 2020, the YouTube video view rate was well over 100,700 and there were over 200,000 impressions – proving excellent for audience awareness.